GROUP RIDE AND FESTIVAL - Langley, BC

September 15, 2012

What is the Ride for Opportunity?

The Ride for Opportunity offers 55km and 77km group ride routes, starting from a private acreage in Langley and returning to the same acreage for an all ages après-ride festival gathering.

Click to read more

Riders will leave the site at 10 a.m. as a group before splitting based on registered speed and ability. The route winds through the scenic countryside of the Fraser Valley and delivers you back to the acreage for a festival gathering with friends and family. Food and refreshments, live music, a chance to relax and a kids program for the young ones will be yours to enjoy in the late summer sun.

Local medical practitioners will be on hand to treat your fatigued muscles, local delicacies will treat your fatigued appetite, and you’ll be able to share cycling stories and enjoy an afternoon with friends, family and fellow riders.

St. John Ambulance, mobile bike mechanics and a group of passionate volunteers will ensure that the ride is smooth, safe, and free of flat tires and broken chains.

The ride is open to intermediate and advanced cyclists.

Cost of Ride Registration: $75

Cost of Festival: Free. (Please invite your friends and family.)

The registration fees cover the costs of the ride, a technical t-shirt, lunch, refreshments after the ride, permitting, and supplies.

Hide

Schedule of Events

9:00 - 9:45 amRegistration
10:00 – 1:00 pmRide
Noon – 3:00 pmFestival

Click for detailed schedule of events click to read more

Detailed Schedule of Events

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Arrive and Park
We will have a team of volunteers ready to greet and direct you for registration and the start of the ride. Bike checks will start at 8:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Registration and Bike Check
Check in and confirm registration, including submitting any outstanding donations. The registration process will include a quick bike check by our on-site mechanics to ensure bikes are safe and have proper tire pressure.

10: 00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Ride for Opportunity
All riders will start at the same time. Signage will denote routes for the 55km and 77km courses. As riders return, there will be a refreshments tent reserved for riders to re-energize before the festival gathering and food tastings. If you have questions or require assistance during the race, please approach a course marshal or flag down a support vehicle.

Noon

Festival Begins
Music and celebrations begin. Friends and family will be able to enter the property and start preparing to receive the riders. Food will be available starting at noon, with mains being served after the final riders return from the course. Tastings will continue until 3 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

Opportunity Interntional Information
A short ten-minute presentation about Opportunity International and the poverty relief projects supported by Ride for Opportunity.

2:30 p.m.

Prizes
Race and fundraising prizes will be presented.

3:00 p.m.

Departure
Food, music and festival programming will conclude.

Hide

Ride Description

Ride description, route maps, prizing and safety information, and racing and training tips. Click to read more.

Ride Description

There’s always a natural element of competition, but we’ve structured Ride for Opportunity as a group ride instead of a race. The aim is for most riders to arrive back at the host acreage around the same time. We encourage riders to push their own limits, but the spirit of the event is friendly and communal. We will offer grand prizes for the top individual fundraiser and the top fundraising team.

We hope this ride will challenge your physical abilities as well as increase your awareness of how we can partner to create new chances for the world’s working poor.

77km Loop
This course is set for avid cyclists who aim to complete 75km in 2.5 hours or less. This route will be signed as Route 1 on course signage. Riders will be placed in the category based on their average speed.

55km Loop
This course is set for intermediate cyclists who aim to ride at an average speed of 20-28 km/h. This route will be signed as Route 2 on course signage.

Ride Maps
MapMyRIDE Route 1 - 77 km
MapMyRIDE Route 2 - 55 km

Safety
We will have First Aid located on site during the event, and also a mobile unit on the road patrolling the course. Our volunteer marshals on the course will alert the mobile unit if any medical issues arise. Cyclists will be required to follow the rules of the road during the race. They must sign a waiver accepting all responsibility for their actions while riding the course.

Please review the Riding Tips:
It’s always more pleasurable to ride with friends than to ride alone. However, riding in a group requires adherence to certain rules. It also requires skills that may take practice. Here are several rules of etiquette to follow when riding in a group. These ‘rules’ will increase your safety and enjoyment on the Ride for Opportunity.

  1. Be Predictable
    This may be the most important rule, even for solo riding, and it involves every aspect of riding, from changing positions in the group to following the traffic rules. If unpredictability is the only predictable part of your riding style, you can be a hazard to yourself and those riding with you. Part of being predictable is riding within the rules of the road as a vehicle. Groups should maintain integrity when approaching intersections. This means staying in the correct lane, stopping together and starting together as traffic allows. If we ride on the road, we must be willing to ride responsibly, especially as a group.
  2. Don’t Overlap Wheels
    This habit can get you in real trouble, and it’s a good way to test your ability to do cartwheels if you don’t adhere to this rule. Some riders may do it from a lack of concentration, while others may not know better, but sooner or later overlapping wheels will cause a crash. There is no recovery from a front wheel deflection. All it takes is for the person in front to move sideways a few inches. If someone is overlapping his wheel, that someone will go down along with practically everyone behind him.
  3. Be Steady
    This includes speed and line. If the person behind you fails to adhere to #2, you’ll contribute to a crash if you divert from your line. When everyone is working for the group, maintain a steady speed as you go to the front. Ride a straight line and keep your speed constant with the conditions. Sudden braking will set off general alarms from everyone in the rear. If you do use the brakes, feather the front brake only and keep pedaling against the resistance. This allows you to moderate your speed without disturbing trailing riders.
  4. Announce Hazards
    When you’re in the lead, you’re responsible for the safety of everyone behind you. You’ll become unpopular if people behind you keep bouncing off potholes, running over rocks or reacting to unsafe traffic situations that you fail to point out. You need to be vocal when approaching intersections, slowing, stopping or turning. All actions should be smooth and deliberate. Sudden, unannounced actions will alarm the group. Riders in the pack should relay these warnings to the rear. When you’re following, announce oncoming traffic from the rear. In this case, others should relay the information forward to the front.
  5. Signal
    Signaling informs vehicles and other riders of your intentions. This makes you predictable. Also, it’s a good idea to make eye contact with oncoming traffic at intersections. Use your right arm straight out to signal a right turn. In a big group, combine this with a loud vocal warning of your intentions.
  6. Don’t Fixate
    If you’re staring at something, such as the wheel in front of you, eventually you’ll hit it. Learn to be comfortable looking around or through the riders in front of you. This will allow you to see things that are developing in front of the group. With a little practice, you’ll be able to sense how far you are off the wheel in front of you.
  7. Stay Off Aero Bars
    Aero bars are too unstable to be used in a group ride. Aero bars should only be used for what they’re meant for—fast solo riding.
  8. Don’t Leave Stragglers
    If you get separated at intersections, as a matter of courtesy, the lead group should soft pedal until the rest have rejoined. If you’re the one caught by the light, don’t run a red light to maintain contact.
  9. Know Your Limitations
    If you’re not strong enough to take a turn at the front, stay near the back and let the stronger cyclists pull in front of you instead of making them go to the back of the line.
  10. Change Positions Correctly
    A common beginner error is to stop pedaling just before pulling off the front. This creates an accordion effect toward the rear. Keep a steady pressure on the pedals until you have cleared the front. After pulling off, soft pedal and let the group pull through. As the last riders pass through, begin to apply more pressure to smoothly take your position at the rear. If you don’t time it correctly, you’ll create a gap and have to sprint to get back on.
  11. Climbing
    If you need to stand, shift up a gear to compensate for the slower cadence and stand up smoothly, keeping a steady pressure on the pedals. This will keep you from moving backward relative to the rider behind you. Apply the opposite technique when changing to a sitting position. Downshift and keep a steady pressure on the pedals to avoid abrupt changes in speed.
  12. Descending
    The leader must overcome a much greater wind resistance as the speed increases. If you’re leading, keep pedaling. Riders to the rear will accelerate faster downhill as drafting becomes more effective at higher speeds. If you’re following, back off a couple of bike lengths to compensate for the greater effects of drafting. If you’re closing on the rider in front, sit up and let the wind slow you or use light braking to maintain spacing, but in both cases keep pedaling against the resistance.
  13. Relax
    Relaxing will allow you to be smooth and responsive. If you see something riding a straight and steady line, you can bet he or she is relaxed on the bike. Relaxing saves energy and makes bike handling much more effective. Anytime you’re riding in close proximity to other riders, there’s always a chance that you may come into contact. If you have tense arms and get bumped from the side, the shock will go directly to the front wheel and you’ll swerve, possibly lose control and possibly go down causing a pileup. If you’re relaxed, it’s much easier to absorb a bump without losing control.
  14. Training Tips
    We’re aware that other commitments such as work, family and fundraising may not allow you to stick to a rigid training schedule. However, you can find programs that are designed to enable you to fit training around work.

Some participants may wish to reduce or remove training sessions, while others may wish to add time or increase the number of sessions. Be diverse—don’t just cycle to get fit. Cross train with other sports—swimming, for example, or running or going to the gym—as this will make training more enjoyable by breaking it up.

Any other workouts will also be a benefit. Ask a fitness instructor at a local gym to put together a weight and stretching program. Spinning is another excellent way to build endurance and anaerobic fitness. Spinning is a high-energy indoor stationary cycling-based group fitness program, where the instructor takes participants on a virtual outdoor road race complete with hills, fast flats, downhills and finish lines. Spin classes will make a noticeable difference to your cycling fitness.

Be Prepared
The secret to preventing injuries and preparing yourself to get the most out of your training is to develop a good personal mileage base. The best strategy is to let the terrain and how you feel tell you when to make more or less effort.

Get Motivated
The more you put in before you ride, the more you’ll enjoy the challenge of the race. Keep this goal in mind at all times.

Beating the Weather
Spinning is an excellent way to build up cycling fitness on a cold, wet day. Gym work on the bike will help improve your fitness, and aerobic classes and swimming are also excellent for overall fitness. When the sun is shining, get your bike out and make the most of it.

Train With a Friend
It doesn’t necessarily have to be another participant in the Ride for Opportunity, but ask around—one of your friends will want to get fit. Make arrangements to meet up and train together. You’ll push yourself harder, and have more fun. Click here for more riding tips.

Hide

Festival Description

We’ll have live music, games for kids, food tastings and much more. Click to read more.

As the ride portion of Ride for Opportunity concludes, the host acreage will be buzzing with the energy of a small village. With live music, games for kids and friends and family cheering on riders as they return, the Ride for Opportunity festival offers a chance to enjoy a relaxing afternoon in the beautiful Fraser Valley.

With picnic blankets offering places to relax in the sun, the festival gathering also includes several local food tastings, with mains to be served after the final riders return from the course. Weary riders will have the chance to be treated by local naturopaths, physiotherapists and massage therapists after they cross the finish line.

The Ride for Opportunity festival is also about awareness—the recognition of the many opportunities we have in Canada and the many challenges faced by communities in the developing world. As the festival progresses, you’ll be able to share and learn more about food, health and how your fundraising can contribute to profound transformation in places that truly need our help.

Bring your friends and family to join us in the celebration—we look forward to a truly memorable day.

Festival Activities and Vendors
List of Activities and Tastings TBD July 15
Download .pdf site map of the festival

Hide

Community Partners

The success of any event has to do with bringing the community together. We are so thankful for the people and organizations involved. Click to read more.

Coming soon

Hide

Ride The Ridge

Saturday August 4, 2013


What is the Ride for Opportunity?

The Ride for Opportunity offers a scenic and challenging 17-mile ascent, starting at Port Angeles and finishing at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center in Olympic National Park. Click to read more

The Ride for Opportunity offers a scenic and challenging 17-mile ascent, starting at Port Angeles and finishing at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center in Olympic National Park.

Starting out at 8:30 a.m., the group ride will head south from town, stopping at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center to regroup. From there, the route heads upward into the scenic mountain wilderness of the Olympic Peninsula. Finishing at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center, the route climbs over 5200 vertical feet. But the unforgettable views from the top make all the work worth it, and you'll see why Hurricane Ridge has a well-deserved reputation as one of North America's most beautiful cycling routes.

A group of passionate volunteers will ensure that the ride is smooth, safe, and free of flat tires and broken chains. Up on the ridge, we'll have food and drinks to treat your fatigued appetite, and you'll be able to share stories and take in the alpine scenery with friends, family and fellow riders.

The best part, though? What goes up must soon come down, and you'll have the opportunity to descend those same 5200 vertical feet on the return journey to Port Angeles—going with gravity this time.

The ride is open to intermediate and advanced cyclists.

Cost of Registration: $50 (Does not include ferry costs.)

Registration fees cover the costs of the ride, including supplies, permitting, and food and drinks.

Hide

Schedule of Events

First Blackball ferry leaves at 6:10 am and they suggest being there 40 minutes ahead of time.

7:40 - 8 a.m.Registration and Orientation
8:15 a.m. – NoonNoon Ride the Ridge
Noon – 2:00 p.mEat and Celebrate
2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.Descend


Click for a Detailed Schedule of Events.

Detailed Schedule of Events

Riders will be responsible for transportation to Port Angeles. There will be groups traveling together, and if you'd like to connect for travel you'll have the chance once you register—it can be cost effective to load trailers of bikes on the ferry instead of riding on. Some participants may want to make the trip the day before and join the group in the morning.

7:40 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Arrive, Check In and Orientation
We will have a team of volunteers ready to greet and direct you for registration and the start of the ride. Backpacks or bags will be loaded into the support vehicles at this time as required.

8:30 a.m. - Noon

Ride the Ridge
17 miles and 5,242 feet of beauty and challenge. It's a tough but rewarding journey that offers a sense of true accomplishment upon arrival. The group ride will include stops at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center and the park entrance before concluding at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center.

Noon - 2:00 p.m.

Lunch and Celebration
At the top, you'll be met by the smiling faces of the Ride for Opportunity volunteers. While you rest your legs, you'll have expansive views of the Olympic wilderness spread out before you, and you'll be able to refuel with local food prepared by resident chefs. There will be a prizes, a brief introduction to Opportunity International, and announcements of thanks to the volunteers, sponsors and fundraisers.

2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Descend
Check your brakes, then start your descend. Take your time and be careful as you enjoy the winding 17-mile downhill tour.

5:20 p.m.

Return Ferry
Purchase your ticket and return to Victoria on the ferry.

Hide

Ride Description

Ride description, route maps, prizing and safety information and racing and training tips. Click here to read more.

There’s always a natural element of competition, but we’ve structured Ride for Opportunity as a group ride instead of a race. The aim is for most riders to arrive the summit within the time allotment. We encourage riders to push their own limits, but the spirit of the event is friendly and communal. We will offer grand prizes for the top individual fundraiser and the top fundraising team.

Safety

Safety
We will have First Aid located on site during the event, and also a mobile unit on the road patrolling the course. Our volunteer marshals on the course will alert the mobile unit if any medical issues arise. Cyclists will be required to follow the rules of the road during the race. They must sign a waiver accepting all responsibility for their actions while riding the course.

Please review the Riding Tips:
It’s always more pleasurable to ride with friends than to ride alone. However, riding in a group requires adherence to certain rules. It also requires skills that may take practice. Here are several rules of etiquette to follow when riding in a group. These ‘rules’ will increase your safety and enjoyment on the Ride for Opportunity.

  1. Be Predictable
    This may be the most important rule, even for solo riding, and it involves every aspect of riding, from changing positions in the group to following the traffic rules. If unpredictability is the only predictable part of your riding style, you can be a hazard to yourself and those riding with you. Part of being predictable is riding within the rules of the road as a vehicle. Groups should maintain integrity when approaching intersections. This means staying in the correct lane, stopping together and starting together as traffic allows. If we ride on the road, we must be willing to ride responsibly, especially as a group.
  2. Don’t Overlap Wheels
    This habit can get you in real trouble, and it’s a good way to test your ability to do cartwheels if you don’t adhere to this rule. Some riders may do it from a lack of concentration, while others may not know better, but sooner or later overlapping wheels will cause a crash. There is no recovery from a front wheel deflection. All it takes is for the person in front to move sideways a few inches. If someone is overlapping his wheel, that someone will go down along with practically everyone behind him.
  3. Be Steady
    This includes speed and line. If the person behind you fails to adhere to #2, you’ll contribute to a crash if you divert from your line. When everyone is working for the group, maintain a steady speed as you go to the front. Ride a straight line and keep your speed constant with the conditions. Sudden braking will set off general alarms from everyone in the rear. If you do use the brakes, feather the front brake only and keep pedaling against the resistance. This allows you to moderate your speed without disturbing trailing riders.
  4. Announce Hazards
    When you’re in the lead, you’re responsible for the safety of everyone behind you. You’ll become unpopular if people behind you keep bouncing off potholes, running over rocks or reacting to unsafe traffic situations that you fail to point out. You need to be vocal when approaching intersections, slowing, stopping or turning. All actions should be smooth and deliberate. Sudden, unannounced actions will alarm the group. Riders in the pack should relay these warnings to the rear. When you’re following, announce oncoming traffic from the rear. In this case, others should relay the information forward to the front.
  5. Signal
    Signaling informs vehicles and other riders of your intentions. This makes you predictable. Also, it’s a good idea to make eye contact with oncoming traffic at intersections. Use your right arm straight out to signal a right turn. In a big group, combine this with a loud vocal warning of your intentions.
  6. Don’t Fixate
    If you’re staring at something, such as the wheel in front of you, eventually you’ll hit it. Learn to be comfortable looking around or through the riders in front of you. This will allow you to see things that are developing in front of the group. With a little practice, you’ll be able to sense how far you are off the wheel in front of you.
  7. Stay Off Aero Bars
    Aero bars are too unstable to be used in a group ride. Aero bars should only be used for what they’re meant for—fast solo riding.
  8. Don’t Leave Stragglers
    If you get separated at intersections, as a matter of courtesy, the lead group should soft pedal until the rest have rejoined. If you’re the one caught by the light, don’t run a red light to maintain contact.
  9. Know Your Limitations
    If you’re not strong enough to take a turn at the front, stay near the back and let the stronger cyclists pull in front of you instead of making them go to the back of the line.
  10. Change Positions Correctly
    A common beginner error is to stop pedaling just before pulling off the front. This creates an accordion effect toward the rear. Keep a steady pressure on the pedals until you have cleared the front. After pulling off, soft pedal and let the group pull through. As the last riders pass through, begin to apply more pressure to smoothly take your position at the rear. If you don’t time it correctly, you’ll create a gap and have to sprint to get back on.
  11. Climbing
    If you need to stand, shift up a gear to compensate for the slower cadence and stand up smoothly, keeping a steady pressure on the pedals. This will keep you from moving backward relative to the rider behind you. Apply the opposite technique when changing to a sitting position. Downshift and keep a steady pressure on the pedals to avoid abrupt changes in speed.
  12. Descending
    The leader must overcome a much greater wind resistance as the speed increases. If you’re leading, keep pedaling. Riders to the rear will accelerate faster downhill as drafting becomes more effective at higher speeds. If you’re following, back off a couple of bike lengths to compensate for the greater effects of drafting. If you’re closing on the rider in front, sit up and let the wind slow you or use light braking to maintain spacing, but in both cases keep pedaling against the resistance.
  13. Relax
    Relaxing will allow you to be smooth and responsive. If you see something riding a straight and steady line, you can bet he or she is relaxed on the bike. Relaxing saves energy and makes bike handling much more effective. Anytime you’re riding in close proximity to other riders, there’s always a chance that you may come into contact. If you have tense arms and get bumped from the side, the shock will go directly to the front wheel and you’ll swerve, possibly lose control and possibly go down causing a pileup. If you’re relaxed, it’s much easier to absorb a bump without losing control.
  14. Training Tips
    We’re aware that other commitments such as work, family and fundraising may not allow you to stick to a rigid training schedule. However, you can find programs that are designed to enable you to fit training around work.

Some participants may wish to reduce or remove training sessions, while others may wish to add time or increase the number of sessions. Be diverse—don’t just cycle to get fit. Cross train with other sports—swimming, for example, or running or going to the gym—as this will make training more enjoyable by breaking it up.

Any other workouts will also be a benefit. Ask a fitness instructor at a local gym to put together a weight and stretching program. Spinning is another excellent way to build endurance and anaerobic fitness. Spinning is a high-energy indoor stationary cycling-based group fitness program, where the instructor takes participants on a virtual outdoor road race complete with hills, fast flats, downhills and finish lines. Spin classes will make a noticeable difference to your cycling fitness.

Be Prepared
The secret to preventing injuries and preparing yourself to get the most out of your training is to develop a good personal mileage base. The best strategy is to let the terrain and how you feel tell you when to make more or less effort.

Get Motivated
The more you put in before you ride, the more you’ll enjoy the challenge of the race. Keep this goal in mind at all times.

Beating the Weather
Spinning is an excellent way to build up cycling fitness on a cold, wet day. Gym work on the bike will help improve your fitness, and aerobic classes and swimming are also excellent for overall fitness. When the sun is shining, get your bike out and make the most of it.

Train With a Friend
It doesn’t necessarily have to be another participant in the Ride for Opportunity, but ask around—one of your friends will want to get fit. Make arrangements to meet up and train together. You’ll push yourself harder, and have more fun. click here for more riding tips

Hide

Ride Maps

Click here for the Hurricane Ridge map (Click on the 3D button to see a fly-through of the course.)


Volunteer

The Ride for Opportunity wouldn't be possible without a host of volunteer support. If you're available to volunteer, please click here to register.


Opportunity Changes Everything

Lifting up families

The old saying goes, give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. Like these humble words, Opportunity International is empowering millions of the world's most impoverished and marginalized people to not only feed themselves, but to lift up their families. Invest in sustainable financial services that will equip the next generation to succeed and continue to help lift up families by becoming a MicroVenture Philanthropist (MVP).

What is the impact of your donations?

With your help, we can make a difference in many families and communities. Click here to read more.

The entrepreneurial poor have the drive and determination to work their way out of poverty. By raising funds and participating, you can help us make a lasting difference in the lives of many families and communities in the developing world.

Here are a few stories of how our work has helped break the cycle of poverty:

How your donations make a difference

  • $10 enables a family to purchase health insurance for a year
  • $40 covers the annual premium for an entire family
  • $50 helps a farmer obtain better quality seed and fertilizer, enabling them to grow more food
  • $80 helps a client fund a school fees to provide a semester of education for a young girl
  • $142 funds a first loan for a woman in a Trust Group
  • $180 brings a dozen women access to a savings account—and identification— for the first time in their lives
  • $250 keeps a mobile bank on the road for one month
  • $300 provides a farmer with a loan and a full range of agricultural-specific financial tools and training
Hide

10 indicators of our progress in ending extreme poverty

Click here to read more


  1. Poverty Rate
    The total number of people living on less than $1.25 per day has fallen by nearly half a billion over the last six years. Another 300 million people should escape poverty by 2015. Never have so many people been lifted from poverty over such a brief period of time.
  2. Hunger
    In 1990, 40,000 people died daily from hunger globally . By 2010, that number had dropped to below 25,000, despite a population growth of 23%.
  3. Birth Rate
    Women in India are now having an average of 2.6 children, down from 5.5 in 1970—cut in half in 40 years. In all developing regions, the adolescent birth rate decreased from 65 to 52 births per thousand over the last two decades.
  4. Infant Mortality
    Since 1960, global infant mortality has dropped more than 50%.
  5. Children’s Health
    Children’s deaths have dropped over the last two decades, from 12.5 million to 8.5 million. This means 10,000 fewer children die each day than in 1990.
  6. Drinking Water
    The proportion of the population in the developing world using an improved water source increased from 71% to 84% over the last two decades.
  7. HIV / AIDS
    New HIV infections have been cut by 23% since the peak in 1996.
  8. Education
    The percentage of the world’s children enrolled in primary school increased from less than half in 1950 to nearly 90% today. Over the last decade alone, primary school enrollment in sub-Saharan Africa increased from 58% to 76%.
  9. Economic Growth
    The economies of the developing world have expanded 50% in real terms over the past six years.
  10. Microfinance
    Over the past 12 years, the number of very poor families with a microloan grew more than 16-fold to almost 130 million.
Hide

JOIN US To Be Part of the Solution!

We’d love you to be involved, in whatever capacity you’re able - whether you ride, support, volunteer, tell your friends or all of the above. Please join us in making a global impact on poverty and maybe being transformed in the process.

Fundraising Tips

Saddle up and Ride for Opportunity. Here’s what you need to know. Click to read more.

Sign up for Ride for Opportunity through this site. You can participate as an individual, or get together with friends to enter as a team. Click on the event you would like to sign up for on the event page and sign up at the link on the bottom of the page.

We ask everyone to fundraise a minimum of 50 dollars.

There will be also be prizing for the top individual and team fundraisers.

A fundraising page will be set up for you.

Fundraise Online

Fundraise online to make the fundraising process fast and easy. Set your goals and create a personal fundraising page. By customizing your page, your fundraising opportunities are almost limitless. Your friends and family can donate from anywhere in the world, and asking is just a click away. You can track your progress easily, and it’s a secure and simple approach.

Set a Goal

Set individual or team fundraising goals and make them public. Challenge your team to be the top fundraising team, and track and share your progress with current and potential donors. Many people will donate more if they know you’re close to your goal, while others can help to remind you of your goal.

Ask Anyone, Ask Everyone

Ask friends and family first. Once you’ve tackled the ‘easy ones,’ branching out is simple. Ask clients, colleagues, acquaintances—anyone and everyone. And don’t forget about local businesses and professionals.

Be Committed

Make the first pledge yourself. When potential donors see your name and contribution, they’ll see how committed you are. Try using your donation as an example of the amount you’d encourage others to contribute.

Promote Yourself

Make sure everyone knows about your commitment. Send an announcement—by email, mail or social media—about your fundraising project to business associates, local companies, schools, churches or community newspapers.

Plan Your Ask

Take some time to prepare before asking for donations. Learn where your donations are going, and start collecting months in advance. For personal or professional reasons, people may not always be available at the last minute to sponsor you. Consider your timing when asking.

Get Matching Gifts

Contact your employer to find out if your company has a corporate matching program. Make sure team members ask their employers as well—it’s an easy way to double your total. Often, even if a company doesn’t have a matching gifts program, they’ll still support your efforts financially.

Educate Donors

Potential donors may not know about Opportunity International. Be prepared to educate them about the working poor and how donated funds are put to good use. Click here

Hide


We’re seeking organizations and businesses that would like to align with Opportunity International, Ride for Opportunity and other important efforts to raise funds and awareness. Please contact Jamie Hubick for further information.